Anti-Influenza A (H1N1) 1918, H1 Hemagglutinin (HA) [39E4] Antibody

This mouse IgG2a monoclonal antibody [39E4] was generated against inactivated virus and specific for H1 hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus A/South Carolina/1/1918 (H1N1).

Highlights

  • Reacts with H1 hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus A/South Carolina/1/1918 (H1N1)
  • Suitable for ELISA, Hemagglutination Inhibition Assays, Neutralization and Western Blot applications

Influenza A (H1N1) virus is the subtype of influenza A virus that was the most common cause of human influenza (flu) outbreaks in 2009 as well as 1918. H1N1 is an orthomyxovirus because it contains the glycoproteins haemagglutinin and neuraminidase. Haemagglutinin causes red blood cells to clump together and binds the virus to the infected cell. In Neuraminidase are a type of glycoside hydrolase enzyme which help to move the virus particles through the infected cell and assist in budding from the host cells.

From the laboratories of Peter Palese, PhD, Adolfo Garcia-Sastre, PhD, Christopher F. Basler, PhD, Thomas M. Moran, PhD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Catalog Number Product Size AVAILABILITY Price Qty
EMS012
Anti-Influenza A (H1N1) 1918, H1 Hemagglutinin (HA) [39E4] Antibody
100ug 2-3 weeks
Regular Price:$376.00
Specifications

Product Type: Antibody
Name: 1918 Influenza HA
Isotype: IgG2a
Clonality: Monoclonal
Clone Name: 39 E4
Reactivity: Virus
Immunogen: Inactivated virus
Species Immunized: Mouse
Purification Method: Protein G
Buffer: 0.1M Sodium Phosphate, pH 7.4, 0.15M NaCl, 0.05% (w/v) Sodium Azide
Tested Applications: ELISA, neutralization
Storage: -20C
Shipped: Cold packs

Data

Western Blot

293T cells transfected with 3 ?g pCAGGS 1918 HA constructs. The blot was probed with an anti-1918 HA monoclonal antibody (39E4) and an anti-actin monoclonal antibody. Total cellular protein of 5 ?g, 2.5 ?g, or 1.25 ?g was loaded as indicated.

Adapted from: Glaser L. et al. J Virol. 2005 Sep;79(17):11533-6.

Provider
From the laboratories of Peter Palese, PhD, Adolfo Garcia-Sastre, PhD, Christopher F. Basler, PhD, Thomas M. Moran, PhD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.
References
  1. Manicassamy B, Medina RA, Hai R, Tsibane T, Stertz S, Nistal-Villán E, Palese P, Basler CF, García-Sastre A. Protection of mice against lethal challenge with 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus by 1918-like and classical swine H1N1 based vaccines. PLoS Pathog. 2010 Jan 29;6(1):e1000745.
  2. Tumpey TM, García-Sastre A, Mikulasova A, Taubenberger JK, Swayne DE, Palese P, Basler CF. Existing antivirals are effective against influenza viruses with genes from the 1918 pandemic virus. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2002 Oct 15;99(21):13849-54.
  3. Glaser L, Stevens J, Zamarin D, Wilson IA, García-Sastre A, Tumpey TM, Basler CF, Taubenberger JK, Palese P. A single amino acid substitution in 1918 influenza virus hemagglutinin changes receptor binding specificity. J Virol. 2005 Sep;79(17):11533-6.

If you publish research with this product, please let us know so we can cite your paper.

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